Projects: Sediment Diversion

Sediment diversions mimic nature’s historic land-building processes by using the power of the river to move sediment and fresh water into nearby basins. This project type can build new land and is critical for helping sustain new and existing wetlands. Sediment diversions provide a sustainable source of sand and mud over time to sustain nearby marsh creation, barrier island and ridge restoration projects.

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Mid-Breton Sediment Diversion

  • State: Louisiana
  • Type: Sediment Diversion
  • Basin: Breton-Chandeleur Basin
  • Parish: Plaquemines
  • Land Benefit: 20,232 acres

This project will be located along the east bank of the river, perhaps in the vicinity of White Ditch. This sediment diversion will convey fresh water and sediments into deteriorating marshes that drain into Breton Sound. The brackish marshes in the influence area have disappeared due to a combination of changes in the supply and distribution of fresh water, rapid subsidence, saltwater intrusion, sediment starvation and storm events. This project will reconnect the influence area with the river and divert sediment and fresh water during flood pulses, building new land and sustaining existing marsh.

Fish and Waterfowl Benefits

This project will build, enhance, sustain and protect wetlands in mid-Breton from saltwater intrusion and storms. These wetlands are vital habitat for the estuary’s fish, blue crabs, waterfowl and other species. 

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Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion

  • State: Louisiana
  • Type: Sediment Diversion
  • Basin: Barataria Basin
  • Parish: Jefferson , Plaquemines
  • Land Benefit: 68,000 acres

This sediment diversion project into mid-Barataria Bay is located along the west bank of the river, near Myrtle Grove. The brackish and freshwater wetlands in the influence area are highly degraded due to a combination of saltwater intrusion, decreased fresh water supply, alterations to the natural hydrology of the area and a lack of sediment input. This project will reconnect the river to the influence area and divert sediment and fresh water to build new land, maintain existing marshes and increase habitat resiliency to sea level rise and storm events.

Fish and Waterfowl Benefits

By building new land and helping to sustain the existing wetlands, this project will restore and enhance critical habitat for fish, ducks and other wildlife in mid-Barataria Bay. Additionally, this project will work to sustain the Barataria Land-Bridge which protects freshwater habitat in the upper part of the basin that provide recreational opportunities for sportsman, including the 30,000 acre Salvador/Timken Wildlife Management Area and the 20,000 acre Jean Lafitte National Historic Park and Preserve, from the saltwater intrusion and storms.

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